Friday, October 17, 2008

Israel /Jews / Sukkot through Chinese Eyes

This is copied, as is from, the official Chinese news site China View. The original article can be found here.

It is just plain a weird view of Israel, Jews, and Sukkot. Is this what the Chinese think Israel is like?

(And a thank-you to Eric for pointing me to this article.)

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Israel seals off West Bank for holiday


www.chinaview.cn 2008-10-13 19:37:08
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Special report: Palestine-Israel Relations

JERUSALEM, Oct. 13 (Xinhua) -- Israeli security forces on Monday sealed off the West Bank for the upcoming Sukkot festival, Israel Defense Forces (IDF) said in a statement.

The IDF said it regards the week-long holiday, which is also known as the festival of Tabernacles and starts Monday evening, as a highly sensitive time, during which it will be "on higher alert."

A member of the Samaritan sect decorates a traditional hut known as a sukkah with fruits and vegetables on Mount Gerizim, on the outskirts of the West Bank City of Nablus October 12, 2008. A sukkah is a ritual hut used during the week-long Jewish holiday of Sukkot which begins Monday at sundown. The Samaritans, who trace their roots to the northern Kingdom of Israel in what is now the northern West Bank, observe religious practices similar to those of Judaism.

A member of the Samaritan sect decorates a traditional hut known as a sukkah with fruits and vegetables on Mount Gerizim, on the outskirts of the West Bank City of Nablus October 12, 2008. A sukkah is a ritual hut used during the week-long Jewish holiday of Sukkot which begins Monday at sundown. The Samaritans, who trace their roots to the northern Kingdom of Israel in what is now the northern West Bank, observe religious practices similar to those of Judaism. (Xinhua/Reuters Photo)
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Till midnight Oct. 21, the West Bank will be closed, and "the passage of those in need of humanitarian and medical aid, as well as other specific requests" will be allowed with special permits, said the army.

The Jewish state routinely imposes a general closure upon the Palestinian territory during holidays and festivals, including Rosh Hashana, or the Jewish New Year's Day, two weeks ago and Yom Kippur, or the Day of Atonement, last week.

Sukkot is a festival that commemorates the 40 years Jews spent in the desert living in temporary huts in biblical times. Many Israelis build sukkahs, or huts, to live or eat in to mark the holiday.

A member of the Samaritan sect decorates a traditional hut known as a sukkah with fruits on Mount Gerizim, on the outskirts of the West Bank City of Nablus October 12, 2008. A sukkah is a ritual hut used during the week-long Jewish holiday of Sukkot which begins Monday at sundown. The Samaritans, who trace their roots to the northern Kingdom of Israel in what is now the northern West Bank, observe religious practices similar to those of Judaism.

A member of the Samaritan sect decorates a traditional hut known as a sukkah with fruits on Mount Gerizim, on the outskirts of the West Bank City of Nablus October 12, 2008. A sukkah is a ritual hut used during the week-long Jewish holiday of Sukkot which begins Monday at sundown. The Samaritans, who trace their roots to the northern Kingdom of Israel in what is now the northern West Bank, observe religious practices similar to those of Judaism.(Xinhua/Reuters Photo)







Members of the Samaritan sect parade the Torah scroll as they take part in a pilgrimage for the holy day of the Tabernacles or Sukkot, in Mount Gerizim near the West Bank town of Nablus, October 13, 2008. The Samaritan religion is an ancient form of Judaism believing in the One God of Israel, and the Torah, the first five books of the Bible. The whole community numbers about 700 people, half at Mount Gerizim and the others in Holon near Tel Aviv in Israel. Picture taken using the slow shutter speed.

Members of the Samaritan sect parade the Torah scroll as they take part in a pilgrimage for the holy day of the Tabernacles or Sukkot, in Mount Gerizim near the West Bank town of Nablus, October 13, 2008. The Samaritan religion is an ancient form of Judaism believing in the One God of Israel, and the Torah, the first five books of the Bible. The whole community numbers about 700 people, half at Mount Gerizim and the others in Holon near Tel Aviv in Israel. Picture taken using the slow shutter speed.(Xinhua/Reuters Photo)
Photo Gallery>>>


A Samaritan high priest raises the Torah scroll during a pilgrimage for the holy day of the Tabernacles or Sukkot, in Mount Gerizim near the West Bank town of Nablus, October 13, 2008. The Samaritan religion is an ancient form of Judaism believing in the One God of Israel, and the Torah, the first five books of the Bible. The whole community numbers about 700 people, half at Mount Gerizim and the others in Holon near Tel Aviv in Israel.

A Samaritan high priest raises the Torah scroll during a pilgrimage for the holy day of the Tabernacles or Sukkot, in Mount Gerizim near the West Bank town of Nablus, October 13, 2008. The Samaritan religion is an ancient form of Judaism believing in the One God of Israel, and the Torah, the first five books of the Bible. The whole community numbers about 700 people, half at Mount Gerizim and the others in Holon near Tel Aviv in Israel.(Xinhua/Reuters Photo)










An ultra-orthodox Jew checks etrogim, a citrus fruit, for blemishes in Jerusalem's Mea Shearim neighbourhood October 12, 2008. The citrus fruit is used in rituals during the week-long Jewish holiday of Sukkot, which begins Monday at sundown.

An ultra-orthodox Jew checks etrogim, a citrus fruit, for blemishes in Jerusalem's Mea Shearim neighbourhood October 12, 2008. The citrus fruit is used in rituals during the week-long Jewish holiday of Sukkot, which begins Monday at sundown.(Xinhua/Reuters Photo)
Photo Gallery>>>


Ultra-orthodox Jews check etrogim, a citrus fruit, for blemishes in Jerusalem's Mea Shearim neighbourhood October 12, 2008. The citrus fruit is used in rituals during the week-long Jewish holiday of Sukkot, which begins Monday at sundown.

Ultra-orthodox Jews check etrogim, a citrus fruit, for blemishes in Jerusalem's Mea Shearim neighbourhood October 12, 2008. The citrus fruit is used in rituals during the week-long Jewish holiday of Sukkot, which begins Monday at sundown.(Xinhua/Reuters Photo)

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